The Prince by Machiavelli: Book Summary in PDF - The Power Moves

 

machiavelli prince summary

The Prince is an extended analysis of how to acquire and maintain political power. It includes 26 chapters and an opening dedication to Lorenzo de Medici. The dedication declares Machiavelli's intention to discuss in plain language the conduct of great men and the principles of princely government. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes The Prince Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays. Machiavelli refers to republics, which are governed by their citizens, and principalities or princely states, which are governed by a single, strong ruler (a prince). Because he is addressing one of those princes, he avoids any discussion of republican government, except to note that republics conquered by a new prince are used to living free, a theme he returns to in later chapters.


The Prince Summary | GradeSaver


There are two machiavelli prince summary of states: republics and principalities. Machiavelli declares that he will not discuss republics, examining only how principalities may be acquired and governed. Principalities are inherited or new. New principalities are either annexed to a ruler's existing territory or are completely new.

New principalities are either used to being ruled by a prince or are used to being free. New principalities are acquired by luck or by strength. Hereditary machiavelli prince summary, which are used to being ruled by the prince's family, are easy to maintain, because tradition keeps the prince's position stable as long as he does not make himself hated.

In Chapter 1, Machiavelli traces the basic outlines of a discussion that will take him through Chapter the different types of states, how to acquire them, and the difficulties they present to a ruler. Machiavelli refers to republics, machiavelli prince summary, which are governed by their citizens, and principalities or princely states, which are governed by a single, strong ruler a prince.

Because he is addressing one of those princes, he avoids any discussion of republican government, except to note that republics conquered by a new prince are used to living free, a theme he returns to in later chapters.

In many of his other works, Machiavelli passionately defended republican forms of government, and he suffered for his defense of the Florentine republic which the Medici now ruled. Hereditary principalities are those in which rule is passed down among members of one family. Machiavelli considers these the easiest to govern and therefore disposes of the subject by observing that any minimally competent prince can hold onto one. At the end of Chapter 2, Machiavelli makes the first of his many observations about human nature, noting that people are inclined to forget that even old established governments were innovations once.

See the List of Characters. Duke of Ferrara actually two dukes, Ercole d'Estewho lost territory to the Venetians inmachiavelli prince summary, and his successor, Alfonso d'Estewho managed to stay in power despite the opposition of three different popes.

The d'Este family had ruled Ferrara for almost four centuries. Previous Dedication, machiavelli prince summary. Machiavelli prince summary Chapter 3. Removing book from your Reading List will also remove any bookmarked pages associated with this title.

Are you sure you want to remove bookConfirmation and any corresponding bookmarks? Sign In. The Prince Machiavelli. Pop Quiz! A prince risks being despised if he does all but which of the following? Start Quiz, machiavelli prince summary. Adam Bede has been added to your Reading List!

 

The Prince Summary

 

machiavelli prince summary

 

The Prince Summary. BACK; NEXT ; How It All Goes Down. How to be a prince, by Niccolò Machiavelli to his BFF Lorenzo de' Medici: Step 1: get yourself a kingdom, and preferably have your own army while doing it since mercenaries are bad news. Be careful when choosing a place to take over. Even though it will be harder to conquer at first. The Prince is an extended analysis of how to acquire and maintain political power. It includes 26 chapters and an opening dedication to Lorenzo de Medici. The dedication declares Machiavelli's intention to discuss in plain language the conduct of great men and the principles of princely government. Machiavelli refers to republics, which are governed by their citizens, and principalities or princely states, which are governed by a single, strong ruler (a prince). Because he is addressing one of those princes, he avoids any discussion of republican government, except to note that republics conquered by a new prince are used to living free, a theme he returns to in later chapters.