Students Use Graphic Organizers to Improve Mathematical Problem-Solving Communications

 

problem solving graphic organizer

A graphic organizer allows a student to quickly organize, analyze, and synthesize one's knowledge, concepts, relationships, strategy, and communication. It also gives every student a starting point for the problem-solving process. Adapting a graphic organizer for mathematical problem solving. Feb 02,  · These graphic organizers from DePaul University are excellent. They help students find a way into the problems. The bonus is that they come in English and Spanish! Start using them right away! I especially like the one that says solve on the left hand side and explain on the right hand side. Problem Solving Templates. Problem Solving Graphic Organizer Printouts. qusalis.cf is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.


Problem Solving Graphic Organizer Printouts - qusalis.cf


As international comparisons, national commissions, and state assessment results confirm, students have difficulty solving mathematical applications problems Lester, ; U. Improving students' problem-solving abilities is a major, if not the major, goal of middle grades mathematics National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, ; ; This article describes our unique approach to mathematical problem solving derived from research on reading and writing pedagogy, problem solving graphic organizer, specifically, research indicating that students who use graphic organizers to organize their ideas improve their comprehension and communication skills Goeden, ; National Reading Panel, Many teachers and students use graphic organizers to enhance the writing process in all subject areas, including mathematics.

Graphic organizers help students organize and then clarify their thoughts, infer solutions to problems, and communicate their thinking strategies. We designed a classroom action research project to study a problem-solving instructional approach in which students used graphic organizers. Our goal was to problem solving graphic organizer student achievement in three areas of our state's math assessment in open-response problems: mathematics knowledge, strategic knowledge, and mathematical explanation.

In this article, problem solving graphic organizer discuss graphic organizers and their potential benefits for both students and teachers, we describe the specific graphic organizer adaptations we created for mathematical problem solving, and we discuss some of our research results of using the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer.

A graphic organizer is an instructional tool students can use to organize and structure information and concepts and to promote problem solving graphic organizer about relationships between concepts. Furthermore, the spatial arrangement of a graphic organizer allows the student, and the teacher, to identify missing information or absent connections in one's strategic thinking Ellis, Middle grades teachers already use many different types of graphic organizers in the writing process.

All share the common trait of depicting the process of thinking into a pictorial or graphic format. This helps students reduce and organize information, concepts, and relationships. When a student completes a graphic organizer, he or she does not have to process as much specific, semantic information to understand the information or problem Ellis, Graphic organizers allow, and often require, the student to sort information and classify it as essential or non-essential; structure information and concepts; identify relationships between concepts; and organize communication about an issue or problem.

Example 1. What did you first think when reading the problem? Did you first think of the meaning of the term "vertices" or that this is a mathematical pattern problem? Did you first think of counting the corners or that this looks like an arrangement of tables? Did you first think to discuss in your solution why you are not just adding four with every square?

Did problem solving graphic organizer first try to think of the singular form of the word vertices? Initial thinking is not a linear activity, especially in mathematical problem solving.

Yet, the result of problem solving—the written solution—often looks like a linear, step-by-step procedure. Good problem solvers brainstorm different thoughts and ideas when first presented with a problem, and these may or may not be useful.

Problem solvers can use a graphic organizer to record random information but not process it. A student can later reflect upon usefulness of the problem solving graphic organizer and ideas. If the information and ideas help the student make relationships between concepts, then they are essential.

A graphic organizer allows a student to quickly organize, analyze, and synthesize one's knowledge, concepts, relationships, strategy, problem solving graphic organizer, and communication.

It also gives every student a starting point for the problem-solving process. Figure 1: Four Corners and a diamond mathematics graphic organizer. Figure 1 depicts the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer. This graphic organizer was modified from the four squares writing graphic organizer described by Gould and Gould The four square writing method is a formulaic writing approach, originally designed to teach essay writing to children in a five paragraph, step-by-step approach.

The graphic organizer portion of the method specifically assists students with prewriting and organizing. We saw beneficial problem-solving aspects in the graphic organizer portion of this writing method for mathematics. Actually, the form problem solving graphic organizer Figure 1 does not have to be given to the students each time. Figure 2 shows how students, using a blank piece of paper, make the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer template. The student folds the paper into fourths, first folding the paper horizontally "hot dog style"then vertically "hamburger style"and finally the inner corner is folded up.

When the paper is unfolded, the creases form the four corners and the "diamond" rhombus in the middle. The teachers reported that students later e, problem solving graphic organizer. Figure 2: Four Corners and a diamond folding template, problem solving graphic organizer.

So how does the use of the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer differ from the traditional Polya's four-step mathematical problem-solving hierarchy? In terms of objectives, it does not. Obviously, problem solving graphic organizer, the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer is designed to help students understand the problem, devise a plan, carry out the plan, and look back Polya, However, by having the non-linear layout of the graphic organizer, the student is not expected to do these "steps" in a hierarchical, procedural order that some students misapply.

It is the implementation process, how students form their response, that is the important aspect of the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer Zollman, a. The pictorial orientation allows students to record their ideas in whatever order they occur. If students first think of the unit for their final answer, then this is recorded in the fifth, bottom-right area. This idea the unitthen, is not needed in the short-term memory because a reminder is recorded.

If students first think of a possible procedure for their answer, this is recorded in the third, upper-right area. The four corners and a diamond graphic organizer allows, and even encourages, students to use their problem-solving strategies in a non-hierarchical order.

A student can work in one area of the organizer and later work a different area. It also shows that completing a problem-solving response has several different, but related, aspects.

Students do not problem solving graphic organizer writing a response until some information or ideas are in all five areas.

The four corners and a diamond graphic organizer especially encourages students to begin working on a problem problem solving graphic organizer they have an identified solution method. As in the four square writing method, the students then organize and edit their thoughts by writing their solution in the traditional linear response, using connecting phrases and adding details and relationships, problem solving graphic organizer.

The steps for the open response write-up are as follows: 1 state the problem; 2 list the given information; 3 explain methods for solving the problem; 4 identify mathematical work procedures; and 5 specify the final answer and conclusions.

The graphic portion of the organizer allows all students to fill in parts of the solution process. It encourages all students to persevere—to "muck around" working on a problem. Further, teachers quickly can identify where students are confused when solving a problem by simply examining the graphic organizer.

The teacher should model proper use of the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer and have students work in groups when introducing this tool. Working in groups allows students to see that many problems can be worked in more than one way and that different people start in different places when solving a problem. In their small-group discussions, students identify relationships between the areas in the graphic organizer and among the various solutions.

Four corners and a diamond problem solving graphic organizer students with a logical framework for writing about problem-solving tasks. Graphic organizers can benefit students when they take standardized state mathematics assessments, specifically open-response problem-solving items.

Most states use a scoring rubric for these types of items. In Illinois, problem solving graphic organizer example, the scoring rubric has three categories: mathematical knowledge, strategic knowledge, and explanation Illinois State Board of Education, Responses are scored on a four-point scale for each category, with scores ranging from zero for "no attempt" to four for "complete.

Higher-ability students sometimes skip steps in their explanations. The four corners and a diamond graphic organizer helps each type of student produce a more complete response in each of the three categories and, thus, problem solving graphic organizer, receive a higher score.

Nine middle school teachers decided to use the open-response mathematics questions as the focus of their action research on the effects of using graphic organizers. Teachers administered pre- and post-tests with their students to see if using the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer impacted their performance. All teachers reported dramatic improvements in students' mathematics scores on open-response items after implementing the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer.

Graphic organizers help problem solving graphic organizer communicate their thinking when they solve problems. The teachers found the use of graphic organizers in mathematical problem solving to be very efficient and effective for all levels of students. The teachers problem solving graphic organizer that their lower-ability students, who normally would not have attempted problems, problem solving graphic organizer now written partial solutions.

The organizer appeared to help average-ability students organize thinking strategies and help high-ability students improve their problem-solving communication skills Zollman, b.

Students now had an efficient and familiar method for writing and communicating their thinking in a logical argument. The samples of student work in Figures 3 and 4 are from an open-response squares and vertices problem before and after the use of graphic organizers in the classroom. Sample 1 shows the work of a student who was presented the problem before becoming familiar with the four corners and a diamond graphic organizer. Sample 2 shows the same student's work later in the semester, after learning how to problem solve using the graphic organizer.

The student's strategy on the pre-test was to count the individual vertices in the picture, then add these numbers. This work shows a misunderstanding of the problem, limited strategy, and no explanation. On the post-test, this same student's work shows a complete understanding of the problem presented 10 squares and a complete explanation of a correct strategy that will transfer to other problems, however, it lacks a concluding algebraic formula to demonstrate mathematical knowledge.

While it is not a perfect response, understanding, organization, development, and reflection are all strongly represented on the graphic organizer, problem solving graphic organizer. The second student's pre-test Sample 3 shows the common incorrect strategy of just counting the total vertices in the picture.

It appears that the student then attempted to "add" the individual pictures in the student's own drawing to again count the vertices. However, without any explanation, the teacher cannot know what strategy, if any, the student was attempting. Again, this work shows a misunderstanding of the problem, limited strategy, and no explanation. This student's post-test Sample 4 illustrates excellent understanding, organization, problem solving graphic organizer, development and reflection of the problem presented 10 squares.

The graphic organizer shows the student's complete, correct strategy, solution, problem solving graphic organizer, and explanation of the problem, problem solving graphic organizer.

For mathematical knowledge, the formula is well explained in words, not as an algebraic expression. This would be acceptable on state assessments, as the problem did not specifically ask for an algebraic expression. Sample 5 is the post-test work of a higher-ability student. This student's work demonstrates a full understanding of the problem, problem solving graphic organizer, a correct solution, and a complete explanation. The drawings also suggest that the student feels a sense of ownership of and satisfaction with the solution and probably finished the problem with plenty of time to spare.

We hoped the students in our action research study would improve their problem solving with an instructional intervention from pre-test to post-test; however, no single instructional method directly affects learning. Rather, instruction is one of many factors that may influence learning. Others include the curriculum, the student, the class, and the teacher.

 

Exceeding the CORE: Problem Solving with Graphic Organizers

 

problem solving graphic organizer

 

students reported that the graphic organizer made them slow down when solving the problems, causing them to avoid minor mistakes and errors. It was concluded that a graphic organizer can be used beyond text comprehension in reading and can promote problem-solving skills and increase problem-solving success in a secondary mathematics classroom. Graphic organizers develop skills in identifying connections and relationships, which can assist students in solving word problems. Using an organizer to solve a word problem may include organizing given information or developing a plan for solving the problem. Problem Solving Graphic Organizer Printouts. qusalis.cf is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.